Lumber

The Wood Yard is open to the public and proud to offer over 20,000 square feet of space to lumber both Domestic and Exotic.

At The Wood Yard we offer our domestic species skip planed and with one straight edge to ease in the processing of the stock for your project. Unlike many other wood suppliers we encourage and help sort through any stack of lumber for you to find the perfect piece. If the perfect piece is twelve feet long and you only need eight feet, we will be glad to cut to length and you are only charged for what you take. If you can't find the perfect piece or size, we also offer a variety of milling services to make what you need.

If you would like a quote for your project please contact us and we'll be glad to assist you.

Domestic Lumber

Photo showing color and grain of Ash
Ash
Has a medium to coarse texture similar to oak. The grain is almost always straight and regular, though sometimes moderately curly or figured boards can be found.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Balsa Blanks
Balsa Blanks
Balsa has a straight grain with a medium to coarse texture and low natural luster.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Alder
Alder
Grain is generally straight, with a moderately fine, uniform texture.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Basswood
Basswood
Grain is straight, with a fine, even texture and moderate natural luster.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Eastern Cedar
Eastern Cedar
Has a straight grain, usually with knots present. Has a very fine even texture.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Western Cedar LNF
Western Cedar LNF
Grain is usually straight; fine, even texture with moderate natural luster.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Cherry
Cherry
The grain is usually straight—with the exception of figured pieces with curly grain patterns. Has a fine, even texture with moderate natural luster.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Cypress LNF
Cypress LNF
Straight grain and medium to coarse texture. Raw, unfinished wood surfaces have a greasy feel.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Spalted Hackberry
Spalted Hackberry
Grain is usually straight or occasionally slightly interlocked, with a very coarse uneven texture.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Hickory
Hickory
Grain is usually straight, though occasionally wavy, with a medium texture. Pores are medium-sized and open.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Ambrosia Maple
Ambrosia Maple
Not a distinct species of maple; describes a fungal discoloration caused by wood-boring ambrosia beetles. The majority of ambrosia maple is found in species of soft maple.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Birdseye Maple
Birdseye Maple
Not a distinct species of maple; considered a growth/grain anomaly. Although rare exceptions exist, birdseye maple is almost exclusively harvested from hard maple (Acer saccharum).
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Curly Maple
Curly Maple
Not a distinct species of maple. Curly maple is considered a grain pattern that can be found in nearly all Acer species.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Hard Maple
Hard Maple
Grain is generally straight, but may be wavy. Has a fine, even texture.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Soft Maple
Soft Maple
Not a distinct species of maple. Soft maple is a commercial term meant to differentiate the wood of some types of maple from hard maple
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Spalted Maple
Spalted Maple
Not a distinct species of maple; spalting is a fungal discoloration caused by partially decayed wood.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Quartersawn White Oak
Quartersawn White Oak
Grain is straight, with a coarse, uneven texture.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Red Oak
Red Oak
Grain is straight, with a coarse, uneven texture. The pores are so large and open that it is said that a person can blow into one end of the wood, and air will come out the other end: provided that the grain runs straight enough.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of White Oak
White Oak
Grain is straight, with a coarse, uneven texture.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of  Pine V-Groove Ceiling Board LNF
Pine V-Groove Ceiling Board LNF
Heartwood is a light brown, sometimes with a slightly reddish hue, sapwood is a pale yellow to nearly white. Color tends to darken with age.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Heart Pine
Heart Pine
Heart Pine is the old growth Yellow Pine once common in the American South and Atlantic Coast regions. These trees were very dense and high in resign content.
Photo showing color and grain of Poplar
Poplar
Poplar typically has a straight, uniform grain, with a medium texture. Low natural luster.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Curly Walnut
Curly Walnut
Heartwood can range from a lighter pale brown to a dark chocolate brown with darker brown streaks. Color can sometimes have a grey, purple, or reddish cast. Sapwood is pale yellow-gray to nearly white. Figured grain patterns such as curl, crotch, and burl are also seen. The variation shimmers in the light and the cross lines called curl are caused by compression of the tree from leaning or being heavier on one side.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Walnut
Walnut
Grain is usually straight, but can be irregular. Has a medium texture and moderate natural luster.
Species Info

Exotic Lumber

Photo showing color and grain of Afromosia (African Teak)
Afromosia (African Teak)
Heartwood is yellowish brown, occasionally with a reddish or olive-colored hue, darkening with age. Narrow sapwood is pale yellow and is clearly differentiated from the heartwood.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Black Limba
Black Limba
Heartwood is a light yellowish to golden brown, sometimes with grey to nearly black streaks and veins. Wood with such darker figuring is referred to as Black Limba, while plain unfigured wood is called White Limba. Sapwood is a pale greyish to yellowish brown, not clearly demarcated from the heartwood. Color tends to darken with age.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Blood Wood
Blood Wood
Heartwood is a bright, vivid red. Color can darken to a darker brownish red over time with exposure to light. Applying a thick protective finish, and keeping the wood out of direct sunlight can help slow this color shift. Well defined sapwood is a pale yellowish color, though given the typically large trunk diameters, it’s seldom seen or included in imported lumber.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Bubinga
Bubinga
Heartwood ranges from a pinkish red to a darker reddish brown with darker purple or black streaks. Sapwood is a pale straw color and is clearly demarcated from the heartwood. Bubinga is very frequently seen with a variety of figure, including pommele, flamed, waterfall, quilted, mottled, etc.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Canary Wood
Canary Wood
Heartwood color can vary a fair amount, from a pale yellow-orange to a darker reddish brown, usually with darker streaks throughout. Pale yellow sapwood is sharply demarcated from heartwood. Color tends to darken and homogenize with age.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Caribbean Rosewood
Caribbean Rosewood
Heartwood color is highly varied, with red, orange, and brown contrasted with darker stripes of blackish brown. Color tends to shift to a darker reddish brown with age. Well defined sapwood is a pale yellow
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Cocobolo
Cocobolo
Photo showing color and grain of Ebiara
Ebiara
Heartwood color ranges from golden yellow brown to a deeper reddish brown, frequently with darker black streaks and stripes. Paler sapwood is clearly demarcated from the heartwood.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Jatoba
Jatoba
Heartwood varies from a light orangish brown to a darker reddish brown, sometimes with contrasting darker grayish brown streaks. Color tends darken upon exposure to light. Sapwood is a light grayish yellow, clearly demarcated from the heartwood.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Katalox
Katalox
Heartwood is dark reddish brown to nearly black, sometimes with a strong purple hue. Sapwood is sharply demarcated and is pale yellowish white. Pieces with curly or wavy grain are not uncommon.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Leopard Wood
Leopard Wood
Has a very conspicuous flecking that gives this wood its namesake. The wood itself is a medium to dark reddish brown with grey or light brown rays, which resemble the spots of a leopard. Like other woods that exhibit the strongest figure in quartersawn pieces, (such as Sycamore), Leopardwood has the most pronounced figure and displays the largest flecks when perfectly quartersawn; this is due to the wood’s wide medullary rays, whose layout can be seen the clearest when looking at the endgrain.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Macassar Ebony
Macassar Ebony
Heartwood has dramatic striped appearance, somewhat similar to Zebrawood. Yellow to reddish brown body with darker brown or black stripes. Sharply demarcated sapwood is pale gold color.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Olive Wood
Olive Wood
Heartwood is a cream or yellowish brown, with darker brown or black contrasting streaks. Color tends to deepen with age. Olive is somtimes figured with curly or wavy grain, burl, or wild grain.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Osage Orange
Osage Orange
Heartwood is golden to bright yellow, which inevitably ages to a darker medium brown with time: primarily due to exposure to ultraviolet light.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Padauk
Padauk
Heartwood color can vary, ranging from a pale pinkish orange to a deep brownish red. Most pieces tend to start a vibrant reddish orange when freshly cut, darkening substantially over time to a reddish/purplish brown (some lighter-colored pieces can age to a grayish brown). UV-inhibiting finishes may prolong, but not prevent the gradual color-shift of this brightly colored wood.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Red Grandis / Eucalyptus
Red Grandis / Eucalyptus
Heartwood color ranges from pink to reddish brown. Paler sapwood is sometimes indistinct from heartwood.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Red Heart
Red Heart
Aptly named, in some instances freshly surfaced Redheart can be a very bright, watermelon red—though color can vary in intensity and hue from board to board: anywhere from a light orange/pink, (similar to Pink Ivory), to a darker brownish red. In some cases, it can look quite similar to Bloodwood, though usually with a more visible and figured grain pattern. Redheart’s vibrant color quickly fades to a reddish brown in direct sunlight, though this color change can be slowed (but usually not stopped entirely) by using a finish with UV inhibitors, and keeping the wood away from strong lighting.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Sapele
Sapele
Heartwood is a golden to dark reddish brown. Color tends to darken with age. Besides the common ribbon pattern seen on quartersawn boards, Sapele is also known for a wide variety of other figured grain patterns, such as: pommele, quilted, mottled, wavy, beeswing, and fiddleback.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Wenge
Wenge
Heartwood is medium brown, sometimes with a reddish or yellowish hue, with nearly black streaks. Upon application of a wood finish (particularly an oil finish) the wood can become nearly black. However, unlike most other dark hardwoods, the heartwood of wenge can lighten (rather than darken) when exposed to sunlight.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of YaYa
YaYa
Photo showing color and grain of Yellow Heart
Yellow Heart
Heartwood color ranges from pale to golden yellow, darkening only slightly with age. Sapwood is a pale yellow/white.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Zebra
Zebra
Heartwood is a light brown or cream color with dark blackish brown streaks vaguely resembling a zebra’s stripes. Depending on whether the wood is flatsawn or quartersawn, the stripes can be either chaotic and wavy (flatsawn), or somewhat uniform (quartersawn).
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Ziricote
Ziricote
Color ranges from medium to dark brown, sometimes with either a green or purple hue, with darker bands of black growth rings intermixed. Ziricote has a very unique appearance, which is sometimes referred to as “spider-webbing” or “landscape” grain figure. Quartersawn surfaces can also have ray flakes similar in appearance to those found on quartersawn Hard Maple. The pale yellowish sapwood is sometimes incorporated into designs for aesthetic effect, or to cut down on wastage.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Swamp Ash
Swamp Ash
The term “Swamp Ash” does not refer to any particular species of ash (Fraxinus genus), but is generally used by luthiers to describe lightweight wood yielded from ash trees which are usually found in wet or swampy areas.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Bolivian Rosewood
Bolivian Rosewood
Color can be highly varied, ranging from reddish/orange to a dark violet/brown, usually with contrasting darker black streaks. Narrow sapwood is a pale yellow and is clearly demarcated from the heartwood.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Spanish Cedar
Spanish Cedar
Heartwood is a relatively uniform light pinkish to reddish brown; colors tend to darken with age. Random pockets of gum and natural oils are commonly present. Grain patterning and figure tends to be somewhat bland.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Tiger Wood
Tiger Wood
Grain can be straight, but is usually wavy or interlocked. Fine, uniform texture with good natural luster.
Photo showing color and grain of Purple Heart
Purple Heart
When freshly cut the heartwood of purpleheart can be a dull grayish/purplish brown. Upon exposure—usually within a few days—the wood becomes a deeper eggplant purple. With further age and exposure to UV light, the wood becomes a dark brown with a hint of purple. This color-shift can be slowed and minimized by using a UV inhibiting finish on the wood.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Honduran Mahogany
Honduran Mahogany
Heartwood color can vary a fair amount, from a pale pinkish brown to a darker reddish brown. Color tends to darken with age. Mahogany also exhibits an optical phenomenon known as chatoyancy.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Patagonian Rosewood
Patagonian Rosewood
Heartwood is a pale to medium reddish brown, frequently with darker brown to black streaks throughout. Color tends to darken with age. Sapwood is a pale yellow to pinkish brown.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of African Walnut
African Walnut
Heartwood is a golden yellow to reddish brown, sometimes with darker streaks and veins. Color tends to darken upon exposure and with age. Sapwood is a medium yellow to light gray,and is generally narrow: it can be up to 3 inches (7.5 cm) wide, and is clearly demarcated from heartwood; a narrow transition zone is sometimes present between heartwood and sapwood. African Walnut also displays a ribbon-stripe figuring on quartersawn surfaces, similar to Sapele.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Peruvian Walnut
Peruvian Walnut
Heartwood tends to be darker than temperate walnut species, with a deep chocolate brown color, sometimes with a purplish hue. May also contain streaks of lighter-colored wood mixed throughout the heartwood, which can sometimes be extensive and result in a high degree of waste. Grain figuring such as curl seems to be much less common than other walnut species.
Species Info
Photo showing color and grain of Ramon (Breadnut)
Ramon (Breadnut)
Heartwood and sapwood are both a pale yellow to light brown and are indistinguishable from each other. Another variety called ramon colorado can have a darker orangish brown false heartwood, often with darker streaks (frequency and extent of this coloration depends on growing conditions and age of tree). Sapwood is prone to fungal staining if not dried properly.